ESC 1000

GENERAL EDUCATION EARTH SCIENCE

Geology

2010-2 Spring Term

 

Dr. Tony Barros

Office: 1522

Telephone: (305) 237-3754

E-Mail: tbarros@mdc.edu

Web site: http://faculty.mdc.edu/jbarros

Text: Earth Science: 13th Edition by Tarbuck and Lutgens

 

Introduction:

The purpose of this course is to present to the student processes and principles of the Earth Sciences. During the semester such varied topics as the historical development of the Earth Sciences, major principles of the Earth Sciences, the age of the Earth, interpretation of geologic cross sections, minerals, igneous rocks, sedimentary rocks, metamorphic rocks, earthquakes, plate tectonics, volcanoes, streams, ground water, glaciation, physical and geological oceanography, and shoreline processes will be studied. It is hoped that the student will become aware of the fact that the earth is a dynamic object: one that is constantly undergoing change.

 

Grading:

Your final grade will consist of three hourly exams each worth 100 points, a Final comprehensive exam worth 100 points, which will include material from all chapters covered during the course. The lowest grade of the these 4 exams will be dropped

3 Exams                                                          300 points

1 Final Exam                                                   100 points

Total                                                               400 points

All students are required to bring at least one #2 pencil to each test.

Students will not be allowed to leave the classroom while working on an exam!

 

GRADING SCALE A=300-270 B=269-240 C= 239-210 D= 209-180 F=<179

 

Extra Credit:  Geology of South Florida field trip 20 points

 

MAKE UP EXAMS WILL NOT BE GIVEN unless the student notifies the instructor on the day of the exam. In addition the student must also presents to the instructor upon his/her return to class a doctor's note, hospital bill, or a legal document that clearly indicates that the student was incapacitated or had a legal responsibility on the day of the exam. If these requirements are not meet the missed exam will be your drop exam. Make up Exams will be "special edition" short essay question exams.

Students who arrive to take an exam after the first student turns in their exam will not be permitted to take that exam.

Cell Phones:

Students who have cell phones are asked to turn them off before entering class. If a cell phone rings (or beeps) that student will be asked to leave the class for the rest of that class meeting. If this happens more than twice during the semester the student will be asked to leave the class permanently.

Attendance:

Students are expected to attend all scheduled class meetings. A student who has more than 4 unexcused absences (morning classes) and 2 (night classes) it will be dropped from the course. But students must remember that the instructor has the right to drop a student for poor attendance, but it remains the student's responsibility to withdraw if he/she wishes to receive a grade of W.

3 tardies = 1 absence

Plagiarism:

Plagiarism or cheating in any class-work will result in an F for the entire course

Miami Dade College Learning Outcomes

As applied to this Course:

1. Use quantitative analytical skills to evaluate and process numerical data.

2. Solve problems using critical and creative thinking and scientific reasoning.

3. Formulate strategies to locate, evaluate, and apply information.

4. Demonstrate knowledge of diverse cultures, including global and historical perspectives.

5. Use computer and emerging technologies effectively.

6. Describe how natural systems function and recognize the impact of humans on the environment.

 ESC 1000 competencies:

By the end of the term you must show knowledge, comprehension, and application of the historical development of the geological sciences. This means that you must be able to:

Identify and/or define terms and people related to the development of the geological sciences including but not limited to Greek and Roman philosopher/scientists, catastrophists, the role of the church in western Europe, and recent developments in the development of the geological sciences.

Identify and/or define the major principles and laws that form the foundations of geology including but not limited to correlation, faunal succession, cross cutting relationships, original horizontality, superposition, and uniformitarianism.

Discuss the relationship between the work that geologists do and our daily lives.

By the end of the term you must show knowledge, comprehension, and application of different methods that are used to determine the age of the earth. This means that you must be able to:

Define various terms that are used in dating the earth including relative age dating, absolute age dating, radioactive decay, half life, atomic number, atomic mass, alpha particle, beta particle, and isotope.

Explain how radioactive age dating techniques are used to determine the age of the earth.

Explain the limitations of different radioactive dating techniques.

Reproduce the geologic time scale using both geologic terms and absolute dates.

By the end of the term you must show knowledge, comprehension, and application of using techniques that you have learned in determining a possible sequence of events that could explain how a selected geologic sequence of strata formed. This means that you must be able to:

Explain what discontinuities are and how they form.

Develop a logical sequence of events that could result in the geologic cross section that you are given.

By the end of the term you must show knowledge, comprehension, and application of the different types of minerals as well as the rock cycle and the three major types of rocks. This means that you must be able to:

Define a mineral.

Explain how minerals are identified.

Define terms that are used in the identification of minerals and specific examples of minerals utilizing these properties including but not limited to: luster, hardness, streak, crystal form, cleavage, fracture, Moh’s hardness scale, taste, and color.

Using common everyday items determine a range of hardness for an unknown mineral.

Compare and contrast, using specific examples, the 7 different mineral groups.

Explain the rock cycle.

Describe the relationship between texture and the rate of cooling as it relates to igneous rocks.

Describe how igneous rocks are classified.

Describe how sedimentary rocks are classified.

Describe how metamorphic rocks are classified

Compare and contrast clastic and nonclastic sedimentary rocks.

Compare and contrast the different types of nonclastic sedimentary rocks.

Define various terms related to the three types of rocks including, but not limited to: metamorphism, igneous texture, evaporite basin, precipitate, mafic, felsic, silicic, intrusive, extrusive, foliated, phyllite, schist, gneiss, porphyritic, contact metamorphism, glassy, oolite, regional metamorphism, organic, salt dome, aphanitic, and cataclastic metamorphism

Describe the steps involved in the formation of coal.

By the end of the term you must show knowledge, comprehension, and application of how and why earthquakes occur. This means that you must be able to:

Describe the geographic distribution of earthquakes.

Define various terms related to earthquakes, including but not limited to: stress, strain, rupture, elastic limit, zone of plastic flow, zone of elastic flow, focus, Richter Scale, Modified Mercalli Scale, and epicenter.

Compare and contrast the Modified Mercalli Scale and the Richter Scale.

Describe how the velocity of different types of seismic waves vary as they travel through the earth.

Describe how to determine the focus of an earthquake using the data obtained from seismograms.

Describe what causes deaths when earthquakes occur.

Describe various ways that scientists are trying to predict earthquakes.

Explain a possible way to control earthquakes.

Describe how buildings might be designed to minimize the effects of earthquakes.

By the end of the term you must show knowledge, comprehension, and application of the concept of plate tectonics. This means that you must be able to:

Describe the historical development behind the concept of plate tectonics.

Describe the various types of plate boundaries

Compare and contrast different lines of evidence that are used to prove that plate tectonics occurs.

Define various terms related to plate tectonics including but not limited to: mid ocean ridge, central rift valley, tensional forces, convection cell, paleomagnetism, Curie Point, remnant magnetism, magnetic reversal, divergent plate boundaries, convergent plate boundaries, transform fault, hot spot, Ring of Fire, subduction zone, Benioff Zone, and volcanic island arc.

By the end of the term you must show knowledge, comprehension, and application of volcanic action and igneous intrusions. This means that you must be able to:

Compare and contrast the different types of volcanoes.

 

Define the following terms related to igneous features, including but not limited to: volcanism, viscosity, shield volcano, strato volcano, cinder cone volcano, composite volcano, nuee ardent, lahar, tiltmeter, harmonic seismic waves, laccolith, batholith, stock, and pyroclastic flows.

Discuss the ways in which geologists try to predict volcanic eruptions.

Compare and contrast concordant and discordant igneous intrusions.

By the end of the term you must show knowledge, comprehension, and application of surface flow of water and ground water. This means that you must be able to:

Discuss the changes that occur in a stream as one travels from its’ headwaters to it mouth.

Define the following terms related to running water and ground water, including but not limited to: zone of aeration, zone of saturation, water table, artesian water system, spring, well, velocity, competence, capacity, discharge, stream, river, stalactite, stalagmite, column, and karst topography

Discuss the stages in stream and valley development.

Discuss the flow of ground water and the relationship between the water table and the surface topography.

Discuss the chemical reactions that occur when ground water travels through limestone.

Discuss the geological effects of ground water.

By the end of the term you must show knowledge, comprehension, and application of the basic principles of oceanography. This means that you must be able to:

Discuss the structure and bathymetry of the continental margins as well as the deep ocean basins.

Compare and contrast the types of sediments found on the seafloor.

Discuss the origin of submarine canyons and atolls.

Discuss tides.

Discuss how wave action modifies coastlines.

Discuss, using specific examples, the movement of sand along a beach and the effects of man’s intervention.

Define the following terms related to oceanography, including but not limited to: turbidity flow, abyssal plains, deep ocean trench, terrigenous sediment, biogenous sediment, hydrogenous sediment, wave height, wave length, wave refraction, long shore current, spit, baymouth bar, wavecut terrace, groin, and jetty.

Grade of Incomplete:

Incompletes will not be given, except in the case of hospitalization or a similar problem on the day of the final examination.

TENTATIVE SCHEDULE

Chapters

11, 1,  2 and 3,

Exam 1

Chapters

7, 8, 9 and 10

Exam 2

Chapters

5, 6, 15 and 16

Exam 3

Final Cumulative Exam (To be scheduled during Final Exam Period). Plan to be around not a time leave early on brake.