ISS 1120 - Social Environment

Syllabus


Fall  2004-1 ( August 2004 - December 2004)

Read the following syllabus carefully.  If you have questions concerning the policies contact your instructor.

Course Instructor

Ms. Maggie Rubio


Ms. Maggie Rubio

Office: Kendall Campus - 6206

Phone: (305) 237-2474

E-Mail: magali.rubio@mdc.edu

 

Course Description

The Social Environment is a 3-credit course that represents a multidisciplinary approach to the study of the Social Sciences. It focuses on the cultural, political, socio-economic and global dimensions of society. The Social Environment is divided into (7) seven modules containing assigned reading, and various other activities which you need to complete and send to your instructor in order to pass the course. The modules are:

1.Introduction to Social Science 

2.- The Cultural System

3. Socialization and Personality

4. Society and its Subsystems

5. Political Systems

6. The Economic System

7.- The International System

Course Competencies

Competency 1:   THE STUDENT WILL DEMONSTRATE KNOWLEDGE OF THE ORIGIN OF THE SCIENTIFIC METHOD, ITS CONNECTION WITH THE SOCIAL SCIENCES, AND THE IMPACT OF CULTURE IN DEVELOPING THE UNIQUE CHARACTERISTICS OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND SOCIETIES BY: 

1.   analyzing the emergence of the scientific method and the influence of philosophy and religion in the development of science.
2.   differentiating between the natural and social sciences and the humanities.
3.   identifying the various disciplines labeled as social sciences and their common characteristics and unique objectives.
4.   defining the terms culture and society and finding the connection between them.
5.   describing the elements and complexity of culture.
6.   differentiating between culture and subculture.
7.   applying the concepts of universalism, ethnocentrism and cultural relativity in different contexts.

Competency 2:   THE STUDENT WILL DEMONSTRATE KNOWLEDGE OF THE BASIC ECONOMIC CONCEPTS, THE HISTORICAL IMPACT ON ECONOMIC THEORIES, AND THE CHARACTERISTICS OF DIFFERENT ECONOMIC SYSTEMS, ESPECIALLY THE AMERICAN SYSTEM, BY:

1.   defining scarcity, economic system, production, distribution, and consumption.
2.   contrasting the major characteristics of the traditional market, and command economic systems.
3.   discussing the concept of money and its role in the economy.
4.   describing major economic ideas and theories and their origins and supporters.
5.   analyzing the historical events that marked their evolution.
6.   recalling the most important economic indicators and their functions.
7.   discussing the problems of economic inequalities and poverty in the world and in the United States and their possible solutions, as well as the ecological consequences of economic growth.
8.   comparing and contrasting these contemporary economic systems: capitalism, democratic socialism, and communism, as practiced in countries such as the United States, Sweden, the United Kingdom, the former Soviet Union, China, and others.

Competency 3:   THE STUDENTS WILL DEMONSTRATE KNOWLEDGE OF FUNDAMENTAL POLITICAL CONCEPTS, THE MOST IMPORTANT TYPES OF POLITICAL SYSTEMS, ESPECIALLY THE AMERICAN GOVERNMENT AND ITS FUNCTIONING, AND THE ROLE OF POLITICAL ORIENTATIONS AND IDEOLOGIES BY: 

1.   defining government, nation, state, nation-state, and politics.
2.   classifying and contrasting, different types of governments. 
3.   identifying and contrasting the most important political ideologies, their origins and supporters.
4.   differentiating various political orientations.
5.   recalling the origin and evolution of the American political system.
6.   describing the unique characteristics of the Constitution and the most important functions of the three branches of government.
7.   discussing the American political process and the role played by pressure groups and political parties at every level of government.
8.   describing the processes to elect or choose the highest political leaders in the United States.
9.   analyzing the struggle of women, African Americans, Hispanics, Native Americans, and other groups to obtain their political rights.
10. comparing and contrasting other major political systems such as those of Great Britain, the former Soviet Union, and China with that of the United States.

Competency 4:   THE STUDENT WILL DEMONSTRATE KNOWLEDGE OF THE GLOBAL DIMENSION OF SOCIETIES AND THEIR RELATIONS AND INTERACTIONS BY:

1.   discussing the role of geography in global relations.
2.   identifying on a map the location of the states of the world.
3.   identifying fundamental concepts in international relations such as nation-state, sovereignty, balance of poser, balance of terror, diplomacy, international law, collective security, international organization, and foreign policy.
4.   identifying the forces that contribute to peaceful versus violent relations between nations.
5.   analyzing the complexity of international economic relations, especially trade, and the role played by governments, currencies, tariffs, multinational corporations, and other organizations.
6.   describing the role of worldwide and regional international organizations in global affairs using as examples the origin and scope of the United Nations and other similar organizations.

Required  Textbook and Study Guide

The following textbooks are required. 

1. Textbook: Social Science: An Introduction to the Study of Society, 11th ed., by Hunt and Colander.

2. Study Guide for Social Science: An Introduction to the Study of Society, 11th ed., Prepared by Sharon Johnson (Optional).

Computer Resources (EXTRA CREDIT)

Limited to 50 points

If you desire/need extra credit you have several opportunities. In the "Student Resources" section, I have listed several web sites that correspond with each of the chapters. You can choose one or many, read the material and submit a summary essay on its content. Each, if well written and covers the material, will give you 10 additional points. You need to write an essay, title it with the subject matter of the web site, and upload it into "Assignment Drop Box" located under "Projects"

Grading Policies

You will be taking a test per module. There are seven modules, so you will be taking seven tests.  Each counts for 100 points. 

It is expected that you participate in class discussions via the "bulleting board". Your participation will be monitored and you can get up to 100 points.

You will be asked to write a research paper on any topic covered by the class. You can do it individually or in groups. . You must send the instructor the topic of your research by the beginning of February. This topic needs to be approved by your professor before you start writing. You must finish this paper by April 12, 2004 and uploaded it into the "Drop Box" located under the "Projects" icon. The research paper is worth 100 points.

Tests (seven) 700 points

Class participation 100 points

Research Paper 100 points

Total 900 points

Point Distribution

810 and up      A

 

720 to 809     B

 

630 to 719      C

 

540 to 629      D

 

450 or less      F

Chat/Office Hours

TBA - Dependant on availability of students.

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2004 Miami-Dade College, Virtual College

Updated: August 2004